Rare Lobster Saved From The Stove

Tristan Wood, a sharp-eyed wholesale fishmonger, has saved a unique lobster from the pot.

Wood runs ‘The Lobster Pot‘. This third generation family firm is based on the Isle of Anglesey and specializes in supplying sustainably sourced seafood. He received the extremely rare tango-coloured live specimen as part of a catch from the Irish Sea.

The rare orange lobster next to a more common black / blue lobster | Photo Credit: Anglesey Sea Zoo

Normally the Common European lobster (Homarus Gammarus) has a mottled dark blue / greeny-brown shell. It only turns pinky orange when it has been boiled and cooked. 

Tristan Wood stated

“As soon as I saw this amazing female in the lobster catch, she stood out from all the other lobsters, and I knew she was unique. I had to save her from the pot! In all the years I have been working in sustainable lobster fisheries, this is the first time I have seen a bright orange individual like this one.”

Tristan Wood picked up the phone and spoke to the Anglesey Sea Zoo about the lobster becoming part of the center’s conservation and breeding program.

“No money changed hands. It was the right thing to do and the Anglesey Sea Zoo’s Lobster of Hatchery of Wales is the perfect place for her to go!” Tristan Wood

Anglesey Sea Zoo

The Anglesey Sea Zoo collaborates with local fishermen on Anglesey and around North Wales to help promote the sustainability of local fishing stocks through the Hatchery’s breeding and release program for the common lobster. Over 3,000 juvenile lobsters have been released through the project since it started.

Frankie Hobro, owner, and director of Anglesey Sea Zoo said:

“The chances of catching a bright orange lobster are estimated at one-in-30million, so we’re incredibly excited that this new addition will join our Lobster Hatchery of Wales. She will be part of our ongoing captive breeding and conservation program because she is a ‘berried hen’. A female lobster carrying eggs. 

We are eagerly anticipating the release of her larvae to see if they are also as orange as the female and to see as the juveniles develop and grow if any of them are bright orange.

It will be very interesting to see if the adult female remains the same orange color when she next molts, as our experience shows that the vivid blue colored lobsters can change their color through molting.

We are delighted to be able to show our visitors this incredibly rare animal!”

Sources: Anglesey Sea ZooDaily MailThe Daily Post