Waiting (Patiently) For Liquivision’s Omnix Dive Computer

Liquivision’s Omnix Dive Computer

Liquivision, I have been patiently waiting for your new dive computer to come out. Do I hype this product that is hopefully on the market in 2017? YES!

Liquivision Products Inc., a company known for their bright lettering on a pitch-black screen and 4-button tap system, is optimistically awaiting a postponed debut of the Omnix dive watch, tentatively priced at US$1600/1510 Euros for computer and transmitter. I can only think of a couple computers on the highest end of the price spectrum that can compare to the contrast and easy-to-read display that Liquivision does so well.

Bret Masson, Sales and Service Rep at Liquivision, met my high level of enthusiasm and product knowledge of the Omnix with good sportsmanship. So what should we know about this dive computer?

How about a computer that can read the PSI/Bar from 10 transmitters and give the Omnix user a direction in which to find those 10 transmitters, if necessary? With a Boat Kit (tentatively priced at $2500/2360 Euros) comprised of a buoy-like device that antennas out of the water and wirelessly connects to the Boat Kit app that will give real-time directions (drift dive anyone?) to the Liquivision divers below? And an App that shows the individual’s PSI/Bar and alerts the App user at a specified pressure amount? What about a Boat Kit designed to transmit two-ways giving the App user the ability to text the Omnix dive computer in real time?

According to the folks at Liquivision, the answer is YES! I will wait for that Omnix!

Liquivision Omnix Boat Kit

Think about this, the accepted emergency protocol for a DTB (Diver [back] To Boat) situation is usually a loud banging sound most likely with a heavy tool clanking against the boat ladder for a pre-agreed number of clanks. I’m old school so I would do 3 short taps, 3 long taps, 3 shorts and repeat (SOS or Distress signal).

This idea of text communication that Liquivision is proposing is VERY new-school. Imagine going out one morning on a boat with the Boat Kit and divers with the Omnix. During your dive the boat notices a heavy fog approaching and your dive site is in a heavy boat traffic area. The captain can look where the Omnix divers are in relation to him and send out a text like, “DTB.” Then follow the divers’ progress and text further instructions if needed.

Now I’m going to play this scenario out as a friendly reminder of what we should do if we are caught diving in heavy fog. You surface to find no boat but are surrounded by the sound of moving watercrafts and no visibility. At this point PLEASE decend to about 15 feet/4.6 meters and deploy your DSMB (Delayed Surface Marker Buoy) and watch for a boat (any boat will do) to take notice. And while you’re down 15 feet keeping a very good tab on the SPG and waiting to be found you’ll think to yourself,

“Man I really can’t wait to get my hands on a Liquivision Omnix.”

For more info on the company’s current line of dive computers, go to the Liquivision website at liquivision.com.

By Mike Sasso