If you ever wondered what it was like to dive nearly seven miles/11 kilometers below the surface, British nonprofit research organization Nekton is in the midst of releasing a series of videos that show a submersible diving the Challenger Deep, the deepest point in the world’s oceans.

The videos were released at the beginning of a mission that Nekton ran in August 2016 to study humans’ impact on the deep ocean. The participating scientists’ results will be released as part of a research effort looking into the health of the deep-sea environment called the “XL Catlin Deep Ocean Survey.”

The first part of the “Journey to the Deep” videos shows viewers the area down to the “Twilight Zone,” about 1000 meters/3281 feet below the surface.

The second video shows what are known as the “Midnight” and “Abyssal” Zones between 1000 meters and 6000 meters/19,685 feet.

The third video will show the really deep “Hadopelagic Zone” which goes down to 11,000 meters.

Nekton‘s co-founder, mission director and submersible pilot Oliver Steeds told the folks at DiverNet:

“While 12 people have walked on the moon, only three people have been to full ocean depth. People have spent 300 hours on the moon and only 3 hours at full ocean depth. Viewers will experience the descent into the darkest depths of the ocean, and encounter the inhabitants and hundreds of facts about the least-known frontier on our planet. Look out for hammerhead sharks, blue whales, sperm whales and the terrifying fangtooth fish.”

Check out Part 1 below, and watch Part 2 here.

For more information about Nekton, check out the organization’s website at nektonmission.org.

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John Liang
John Liang is the News Editor at DeeperBlue.com. He first got the diving bug while in High School in Cairo, Egypt, where he earned his PADI Open Water Diver certification in the Red Sea off the Sinai Peninsula. Since then, John has dived in a volcanic lake in Guatemala, among white-tipped sharks off the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica, and other places including a pool in Las Vegas helping to break the world record for the largest underwater press conference.

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