Archaeologists working for the U.K.’s Maritime Archaeological Trust have discovered an additional wooden structure next to what is believed to be the oldest boat-building site in the world.

The 8,000-year-old site dates back from the Stone Age and is located on the Isle of Wight.

Talking about the new find, Garry Momber, director of the Maritime Archaeological Trust, said:

“This new discovery is particularly important as the wooden platform is part of a site that doubles the amount of worked wood found in the UK from a period that lasted 5,500 years. The site contains a wealth of evidence for technological skills that were not thought to have been developed for a further couple of thousand years, such as advanced woodworking. This site shows the value of marine archaeology for understanding the development of civilization. Yet, being underwater, there are no regulations that can protect it. Therefore, it is down to our charity, with the help of our donors, to save it before it is lost forever.”

The original site was discovered in 2005, and has since then been subject to extensive research, including the creation of a 3D digital model, which brings the site to life for non-divers.

The site is being subject to further investigation, and recovered artifacts are being preserved and stored to protect them for future generations.

To learn more about the Maritime Archeological Trust, click here.

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