PADI’s third-annual Women’s Dive Day will take place this weekend on Saturday, July 15th.

The dive training agency’s dive centers and resorts around the world are hosting more than 830 events in 78 countries, uniting thousands of divers — both male and female alike — to cultivate a stronger dive community.

Since its inaugural event in 2015, PADI Women’s Dive Day has generated an avenue for camaraderie, exploration and just pure fun by inviting new and experienced divers to participate in events ranging from underwater cleanups and sunset dive cruises, to shark dives and travel adventures. Over the past three years, this tradition has succeeded in its efforts to foster a more active and engaged dive community on a number of levels, according to PADI.

While this particular day is inherently focused on female divers, an underlying objective of the initiative is to bring more people of every demographic into the sports of scuba and freediving: More certified women divers brings more children, spouses, friends and even more multigenerational families into diving, creating a stronger dive community and more ocean advocates.

Kristin Valette, chief marketing and business development officer for PADI Worldwide, says:

“As a female dive industry executive, my personal hope is to champion a dive community that empowers and inspires women of all ages — and their loved ones — to become lifetime participates in the sport and lifelong advocates for the oceans. On the surface, Women’s Dive Day offers an opportunity for women to try out a new hobby, meet other female divers or reconnect with a sport they may have drifted away from. But it also provides a platform to spark a dialogue with women who may have thought diving wasn’t suited for them for a variety of reasons, or who never realized that diving was something that they could do with their whole family.”

While diving has historically been perceived to be a male-centric sport, PADI has been working to challenge long-standing misconceptions about diving from a perspective to which many women can relate. To this end, PADI is furthering the global celebration of women in diving by hosting a series of blog articles, social posts and videos featuring inspirational testimonials from female PADI Professionals and divers. Their stories speak to the impact that diving has had on their lives while providing an opportunity to address a variety of topics such as equipment needs and health issues that many people, particularly women, are curious about.

The unifying message is that with proper training, anyone of any age or background can learn to dive and experience the adventure and discovery that diving offers.

PADI AmbassaDiver and Master Scuba Diver Trainer Gemma Smith says:

“I think my favorite part of PADI Women’s Dive Day is the camaraderie between all of us. I really feel like I’ve made some friends for life. We’re all here with a common goal — to show how cool and how fun diving is to get more women into the sport that we all love so much.”

If you want more info on PADI Women’s Dive Day or to find an event near you, check out the PADI website at padi.com.

John Liang

John Liang is the News Editor at DeeperBlue.com. He first got the diving bug while in High School in Cairo, Egypt, where he earned his PADI Open Water Diver certification in the Red Sea off the Sinai Peninsula. Since then, John has dived in a volcanic lake in Guatemala, among white-tipped sharks off the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica, and other places including a pool in Las Vegas helping to break the world record for the largest underwater press conference.

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