If you’re a fan of the BBC’s internationally acclaimed, landmark nature documentary series Blue Planet II, particularly the scenes of the Antarctic seafloor and the the brine pools in the Gulf of Mexico, the folks who brought you those scenes have a new initiative.

A global coalition of leading media, science and philanthropy partners recently announced the launch of “OceanX,” a new initiative to explore the ocean and bring it back to the world through media.

OceanX will unite next-gen technology, fearless science, compelling storytelling, and immersive experiences to educate, inspire, and connect the world with the ocean.

Ray Dalio, founder of OceanX and president of Dalio Philanthropies, said:

“I believe that ocean exploration is more exciting and important than space exploration. We are on a mission to show people that.”

OceanX will enable explorers and researchers to explore the unseen ocean, map uncharted areas of the world, observe rare deep-sea creatures and pursue scientific and medical breakthroughs — and then bring all of these wonders back to the wider world through captivating media.

Mark Dalio, founder and creative director of OceanX Media, said:

“Our team of scientists, researchers and filmmakers, including from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the BBC team that brought you Blue Planet II, will explore the oceans and create exciting content and stories to inspire a human connection to the sea. We plan to bring you the excitement of ocean discovery the way The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau did.”

OceanX will also bring the oceans to life through virtual classrooms, museum exhibits, interactive gaming and virtual reality displays, inspiring a deep and personal connection with the oceans for millions of people across the world.

All of this will be created aboard the most advanced science and media vessel ever built, the M/V Alucia2, debuting in early 2019 and building on the legacy of OceanX’s current marine research vessel the M/V Alucia. The Alucia2 will feature state-of-the-art onboard dry and wet marine research labs, cutting-edge media equipment and a top-of-the-line production and media center, manned and autonomous deep-sea submersibles and helicopters and drones.

Model of OceanX's M/V Alucia2
Model of OceanX’s M/V Alucia2

Alucia2’s filmmaking capabilities have been developed in consultation with filmmaker and ocean explorer James Cameron, and the ship has been designed by Hollywood’s leading studio production engineers.

Cameron said:

“With OceanX and Alucia2, we will reignite global passion for and curiosity about the ocean in our global, digitally-connected age.”

OceanX has a whole bunch of partners, including the American Museum of Natural History, BBC Studios, Beijing Qiaonyu Foundation, Bloomberg Philanthropies, California Academy of Sciences, Conservation International, the National Geographic Society, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and many more.

Woods Hole’s David Scully said:

“Our mission to explore and understand the ocean has never been more important or urgent, and we are thrilled to be part of OceanX.”

For more info, check out oceanx.org.

Get More Articles Like This!

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter and get more interesting stuff like this direct to your email inbox every Friday.

Thanks for subscribing - check your inbox for more info

Ooops - something went wrong

John Liang
John Liang is the News Editor at DeeperBlue.com. He first got the diving bug while in High School in Cairo, Egypt, where he earned his PADI Open Water Diver certification in the Red Sea off the Sinai Peninsula. Since then, John has dived in a volcanic lake in Guatemala, among white-tipped sharks off the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica, and other places including a pool in Las Vegas helping to break the world record for the largest underwater press conference.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.